Susan Bulkeley Butler Women's Archives - Women in Purdue History
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Notable Women in Purdue History
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Agee was born in Gary, Indiana and graduated from Purdue in 1981 with a BS in Accounting. As a sophomore in 1978, Agee was named Purdue's Homecoming Queen out of an initial group of 24 competitors. She was the first African American to hold the position. Agee was also an active student, as she was a member of Alpha Lambda Delta freshman honor society, Purdue Pals, the Black Voices of Inspiration Choir, and the Society of Minority Managers. In addition, Agee also served as a social counselor for the Business Opportunity Program in the School of Management and was a member of the Mortar Board senior honor society at the time of her graduation.

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Akeley was born in Vienna, Austria in 1904. Akeley chose to focus on comparative religion at college, but also studied physics (specifically x-rays) at the request of her parents. Forced to leave college early for personal reasons, Akeley began working as an editor for a Viennese printing firm. As the Nazis gained more political power, Akeley's Jewish employer was forced to flee Austria. In his absence, she was in charge of liquidating the company's assets. During this time, Edward Akeley, a Purdue physics graduate student, came to Austria and met Anna. Upon his second visit to Austria, they decided to get married, and she came back to the United States with him, arriving in Lafayette in 1942. Shortly after coming to Purdue, Anna learned that she would be teaching physics due to the wartime personnel shortage. Although she was very excited, Anna had been away from the formal study of physics for nearly twenty years and had never been taught physics in English. Despite these initial setbacks, Anna went on to teach numerous courses throughout her 29 years in the Purdue Physics Department. She was elected by her students to receive a Best Instructor Award in 1966, "In Recognition of Outstanding Works Being Done in the Classroom." Always referring to herself as a "simple physics teacher," Anna retired with tenure in 1971. She was the only member of the Physics Department without a physics degree.

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Albjerg and her husband, Victor Lincoln Albjerg, both taught in the History Department at Purdue. She received her BA from Franklin College in 1917 and a PhD in History from the University of Wisconsin in 1926. She headed the History Department at the Alabama State College for women for two years before resigning in 1927 to marry and travel to Purdue. Upon arriving in Lafayette, Marguerite worked as an instructor from 1928 until 1963. Despite having a PhD in history, Marguerite was kept from attaining a full position at the university because of anti-nepotism laws. Marguerite and Victor published several works together, including Europe from 1914 to the Present, and From Sedan to Stresa: Europe since 1870.

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Austin was born in 1903 in Wilton Junction, Iowa. She received degrees from both Iowa State College and the University of Iowa. She taught in numerous Iowan public schools from 1925 to 1932. In addition, she served on the faculty of the Nebraska State Normal College from 1933 to 1935, before coming to Purdue in 1936. Austin became an instructor of home economics in 1938, and was later named an assistant professor of applied design in 1948. She finally retired due to illness in 1962 from her position as an associate professor of applied design. She passed away in Davenport, Iowa on February 20, 1965.

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Katharine Beeson was born in 1867 and became a prominent Hoosier educator and author. Beeson taught in Indiana schools in Indianapolis and Lafayette. In 1904, she was a teacher in Indianapolis city schools. Eventually, Beeson came to live in Lafayette, where she taught at Centennial School. She also became the Supervising Principal of Lafayette Public Schools. Beeson was a member of the National Education Association, the Indiana State Teachers' Association, and served as the secretary for the Lafayette Art Association. She wrote three books, titled Child's Calendar Beautiful (1905), Literary Indiana (1925), and The Health Game (1925), which was a guide for children and parents who promoted cleanliness and personal hygiene.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Biester earned her BA in 1912 and her MA in 1913 from the University of Illinois. She came to Purdue shortly thereafter and worked as an instructor in home economics. While at Purdue, she served as an advisor to the female students through her involvement with organizations, such as Omicron Nu and the YWCA. She was also a member of the American Home Economics Association and the Indiana Home Economics Association. Although she resigned from Purdue in 1915, Biester remained involved in the field of home economics and wrote Nutrition and the Family's Food. Biester's publications are also found in numerous different journals and magazines such as Science and the American Journal of Diseases of Children.

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Bilhuber (b. 1895) worked in the Physical Education for Women Department at Purdue. She received her MSPH (Master's degree in Public Health) in 1925 and DPH (Doctor's degree in Public Health) in 1926 from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. In 1924, Bilhuber was admitted into the American Public Health Association. During her time at Purdue, Bilhuber became the Head of the Physical Education for the Women's Department. As department head, Bilhuber was involved with many activities related to female Purdue students. In 1928, she started Gamma Alpha Eta, the first club for female athletes at Purdue. She also served on a committee in 1927 that aimed to "investigate the matter of residence halls for women students, and to report upon the comparative value of the systems in use in other education institutions." She retired from her position as department head in 1929.

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Katherine Golden Bitting (1869-1937) earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Purdue in 1892, and became an instructor soon after graduating. She married Arvill Wayne Bitting, a professor of veterinary science, and they went on to take jobs at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Katherine, a microanalyst in the chemistry division, gained expertise on food preservation and related topics, authoring nearly fifty pamphlets in that subject area. Her 4,346 volume collection of gastronomic literature from the fifteenth through twentieth centuries now resides at the Library of Congress' Rare Books and Special Collections Division.

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Hailing from West Lafayette, Indiana, Bosard was a student at Purdue University from 1914 until she graduated in 1918 with a BS in Home Economics. Helen was very active during her years at Purdue. She participated in Omicron Nu, Y.W.C.A., the Purdue Girls' Club (for which she served as treasurer), Student Council, and the Philalethean Society, among others.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Susan Bulkeley Butler graduated from Purdue in 1965 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Management from the Krannert School of Management. The following year, she joined Arthur Andersen & Co., one of the then Big 8 Accounting firms, as the first professional female employee. Butler went on to become the Managing Partner of the Office of the CEO for Andersen Consulting/Accenture, until her retirement from Accenture in 2002. Butler, who has established a reputation as a "benefactor extraordinaire" for Purdue, holds an honorary doctorate from the Krannert School of Management, where she has an endowed chair and a scholarship for women student leaders. A leading member of the Women for Purdue, a group that is dedicated to women's leadership giving, she donated $3.65 million in order to establish the Institute of Leadership Excellence in Discovery Park, as well as an endowed chair. Butler has served on the Purdue Research Foundation Board, the Dean's Advisory Council at Krannert, and is past president of the university's President's Council. She was presented with the Business Leadership Award from the Krannert School in 2004. In 2006, Butler was appointed by Governor Mitch Daniels to Purdue's Board of Trustees, and participated in selecting a successor to President Martin Jischke, Dr. France Cordova. Butler's generous gift of $1 million to the Purdue University Libraries recently established the Susan Bulkeley Butler Women's Archives, which will document the lives and accomplishments of women affiliated with Purdue University and the state of Indiana.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Byrkett was born in Lafayette, Indiana to Clarence and Mary Arvin on May 11, 1946. She was an advocate for disability accessibility who led a crusade at Purdue to improve mobility conditions for the physically handicapped, as she was born with muscular dystrophy. Although she was accepted to attend classes at Purdue, the West Lafayette campus was largely inaccessible to individuals with physical disabilities. Byrkett along with support of others was instrumental in bringing about the building modifications that are now a part of Purdue's campus. She eventually graduated from IUPUI with a degree in Social Work from 1984. After graduation, Byrkett tenaciously advocated for the rights of those with disabilities until she passed away in 2009 at age 63.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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France A. Córdova was the eleventh president of Purdue University. Upon her appointment as the president, she became both the first female and the first Hispanic president of the university. During her formative years, Córdova attended Bishop Amat High School in West Covina, California, and was active in her community as well as in school activities. After high school, Córdova was initially drawn to the liberal arts, graduating cum laude from Stanford University with a bachelor's degree in English. After the Apollo 11 moon landing, Córdova's early interest in science was renewed and she became fascinated by space. While working as a lab assistant, she took classes to build foundational knowledge of astrophysics before ultimately earning her PhD in astrophysics from the California Institute of Technology in 1979. Following the completion of her doctorate degree, Córdova had a ten year appointment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. She became an educator at Pennsylvania State University, where she began as a professor before being promoted to the head of the newly developed Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Córdova left this position upon her appointment as the Chief Scientist of NASA where she worked on the Hubble Space Telescope. In 1996, she returned to higher education as the vice chancellor for research and professor of physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. From 2002 until her appointment as Purdue's eleventh president, Córdova remained in the University of California system as the chancellor of the Riverside campus. While at Purdue, Córdova established the College of Health and Human Sciences and the Global Policy Research Institute. Since the conclusion of her tenure at Purdue, Córdova has served as the chair of the Board of Regents for the Smithsonian Institution and, more recently, as the head of the National Science Foundation.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Cammack earned her BA from DePauw University in 1928. She then traveled to the University of Illinois to pursue a BS in Library Science, which she received in 1929. After finishing school, Cammack was hired by Purdue Libraries as an order assistant in 1929 before serving as a librarian. By 1955, she had become the head of the library's Order Department, with the rank of assistant professor. She also worked as an archivist outside of Purdue, helping to compile and process collections for the DePauw University and Indiana Methodism archive.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Capaldi earned her BA from the University of Rochester in 1965. By 1969, she graduated with a PhD in Experimental Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. In the same year, she secured a position at Purdue University as an assistant professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences. Capaldi remained at Purdue through 1988, serving as a professor, Head of the Department of Psychological Sciences (1983-1988), and as Assistant Dean of the Graduate School (1982-1986). After leaving Purdue, Capaldi stayed active in academia. She worked as a professor and as provost for the University of Florida and the University at Buffalo, SUNY. Currently, she is the Executive Vice President and Provost of Arizona State University. Capaldi also served as president for both the American Psychological Society and the Midwestern Psychological Association, and she is involved with the Psychonomic Society and held a position on the Board of the Buffalo Museum of Science.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Chiscon worked at Purdue for 35 years before retiring as a Professor Emerita. After earning her BS in Science Education from Western Illinois University, Chiscon taught as a high school science teacher before returning to school and receiving her doctorate in Immunobiology from Purdue. Upon graduation, Chiscon joined Purdue's Department of Biological Sciences as an instructor in 1964. She continued to teach and worked as both a professor and the Associate Dean of the College of Science. Throughout her time at Purdue, Chiscon worked to encourage her students, especially her female students. As she stated, "Very few women were in science when I started teaching. I let them know that a woman could be educated, married, and have children and still be normal." She was instrumental in organizing the Women in Science program, and designed and taught Women and the Science Disciplines, the first course of its kind in the nation to be taught at a college of science. She also served as the Chairman of the Athletic Affairs Committee, a position she used to help bring women's collegiate sports under the same national organizations as the men's. Martha Chiscon has received numerous awards in recognition of her outstanding work as an educator, including the National Ohaus Innovation in Teaching Award, the Indiana Professor of the Year Award, and the Helen B. Schleman Gold Medallion Award.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Christoff was a student at Purdue who earned her BS in Civil Engineering in 1965. She was active in the Society of Women Engineers throughout her time as an undergraduate at Purdue. In 1967, Christoff also earned her M.S. in Education from Purdue.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Church was born in Boston in 1920. She received her AB from Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University(1941), her MA from Columbia University (1942), and then returned to Radcliffe for her PhD (1944). Church taught at Temple University and at Duke University before coming to Purdue in 1953, where she joined the English Department. Church was the first woman to become a full professor in the School of Liberal Arts at Purdue in 1965. In 1955, Church helped found the internationally known journal, Modern Fiction Studies. She played an instrumental role in the publication and served as its co-editor from 1971 until her death. The journal remains under the direction of Purdue's English Department to this day. Church also founded Purdue's doctoral program in Comparative Literature and served as its first director. Outside of Purdue, Church was widely known for her work with the James Joyce Foundation and for her many published writings. She wrote two books which are titled Time and Reality: Studies in Contemporary Fiction (1963) and Don Quixote: The Knight of La Mancha (1971). Before her death in 1982, Church was also in the midst of finishing a third book, Structure and Theme: Don Quixote to James Joyce. The work was later finished by a friend and colleague of Church. Throughout nearly thirty years at Purdue, Church acted as a mentor to numerous women. In 1998, the Purdue Board of Trustees named a distinguished professorship in honor of Church.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Clifton came to Purdue in 1964 to become the Head of the Department of Physical Education for Women. Before coming to Purdue, Clifton worked as the Chairman of the Undergraduate Men's and Women's Physical Education Major Unit at the University of California at Los Angeles. During her time as department head, Clifton worked to improve and promote the field of women's physical education. She and co-author Hope Smith agreed to donate one-third of the royalties from their book, Introduction to Human Movement, to expand the Department of Physical Education for Women. Clifton also served as the president of the American Association of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Barbara Cook came to Purdue in 1956 as a counselor in the Office of the Dean of Women. One of her responsibilities in that capacity involved serving as an advisor to the Mortar Board, a senior-student honor society over which she presided for nearly thirty years. Cook also served as director of the Placement Service for Women, assistant and associate Dean of Women, associate Dean of Students, and, from 1980-1987, Dean of Students. She was also a lecturer in the School of Education, and a professor of education from 1987-1989. Nationally recognized for her efforts in promoting career opportunities for women, Cook served in several positions within the organization that is currently known as the National Association for Women in Education. She is also the recipient of numerous awards for her work, including the Helen B. Schleman Gold Medallion for Distinguished Contributions to Purdue University, the Dean Beverley Stone Award for Personal Counseling Contributions, and the Distinguished Lifetime Mortar Board Member Award. Since her retirement in 1989, Barbara Cook has been an active member of the Lafayette community and involved with many organizations, including the Salvation Army, Greater Lafayette YWCA, West Lafayette Redevelopment Commission, and the Indiana Governor's Commission for Women. In 2004, a sculpture entitled "When Dreams Dance" was dedicated to Cook and her late colleague and friend, Beverley Stone. It is located in between Schleman and Hovde Halls. Today, the current chapter of the Purdue Mortar Board is named in Cook's honor, who advised the group from 1956-1986.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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As the daughter of Stanley Coulter, Purdue's first Dean of Science, Coulter's life was closely tied to Purdue University. She received her BA in 1902 from Smith College. Coulter returned to Lafayette, Indiana in 1907 and married Albert Smith, a Purdue Civil Engineering graduate. They had two children, Catherine and Frederick.

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Born in Kirkpatrick, Indiana, Cunningham graduated from Purdue University in 1894 with a BS. Her senior science project was titled, "Value of Seed Characteristics in Determining Specific Rank." After graduation, she joined the Indiana Academy of Science and participated in the State Biological Survey. She also worked for Purdue Dean of Science Stanley Coulter to map the plants of Tippecanoe County as part of a larger project, the Catalogue of Plants of Indiana. In addition, her article "Distribution of the Orchidacee in Indiana" was published in the Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science in 1895.

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Cunningham was from West Lafayette, Indiana. She attended Purdue and graduated in 1896 with a BS. While a Purdue undergraduate, Clara was very active in clubs and served as the President of the Young Women's Christian Association, President of the Philalethean Society, and was the class secretary for 1896. Her senior thesis was titled, "Effects of Drought on Certain Native Plants." After graduation, she eventually moved to South Bend, Indiana and became involved with the Indiana Academy of Science, which published some of her work.

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Curiel graduated from Purdue in 1976 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Radio, TV and Film. She went on to become a writer-producer for ABC news, then a journalist for the New York Times. From 1993-1997, Curiel worked as a presidential speechwriter at the White House during the Clinton Administration. She then served as the United States Ambassador to Belize from 1997-2001. Currently, she is one of sixteen members on the editorial board for The New York Times, writing primarily on New York politics and policies.

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Davidson was born in 1866 in Hazleton, Indiana. Her parents were Phavilla Cunningham and Jasper Davidson. She attended classes at the Purdue Preparatory school in the early 1880s. Later, during the 1886-1887 academic year, she was listed as an irregular student, or a student who came to campus to take select classes. She was enrolled to study history, arithmetic, and wood-carving. Davidson was counted as part of the Purdue class of 1888, though she dropped out before graduation. She eventually married Frank Lockwood and passed away in 1947.

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Davidson was born to Jasper Newton Davidson and Levanda J. Huff of Whitesville, Indiana on April 2, 1863. Davidson's father, Jasper Newton Davidson, was a member of the Purdue Board of Trustees from 1889 until 1895. She attended the Central Normal School in Lagoda, Indiana for three years and married James M. Waugh on December 11, 1889. Davidson's husband, James, was a civil engineer who graduated from Purdue in 1883. After their marriage, the couple settled in Crawfordsville, Indiana. Davidson wrote a book, Early Trail and Centennial History of Methodist Episcopal Church: The Path of a Century, in 1925. In 1927, she compiled a book that traced the history and genealogy of the Davidson family. Davidson was also involved with the Daughters of the American Revolution.

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Graduating from Purdue with a BS in 1891, Doan (1872-1960) stayed at Purdue for her MS before pursuing a PhD at Cornell University. Her focus at Cornell was chemistry and she received a fellowship to study there. During her career as an educator, Doan taught at Earlham College, Vassar, and Iowa Wesleyan. At Vassar, she served as an instructor in chemistry. She also worked as a professor of chemistry and the Dean of Women for Earlham College from 1915 until 1926. She also became a member of the Advisory Committee for the Indiana Historical Commission and served as a delegate for the 1925 convention of the American Association of University Women. In 1963, the Martha Doan Memorial Garden in Westfield, Indiana was dedicated in her honor by the local Women's Club.

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Drake earned her BS in Economic Analysis, an MLS from Simmons College, and a BI from Harvard University. Upon completing her education, Drake worked in the private sector as a management consultant and research analyst for fourteen years. She came to Purdue as an Assistant Director for Library Support Services and eventually went to work for Georgia Tech in 1984. She retired in 2001 from her position as the Dean and Director of the Library and Information Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She also served as President of the Special Libraries Association. A prolific writer and researcher, Drake has several publications and received numerous awards, including the American Library Association Hugh Atkinson Award for innovation and risk taking in 1992. She has also been awarded honorary doctorates from Indiana University and Simmons College.

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Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), famed woman aviation pioneer most well-known for her solo flights across the Atlantic, joined the faculty of Purdue in the fall of 1935 as a counselor in the study of careers for women and an advisor in aeronautics. She was recruited by President Edward C. Elliott during the Fourth Annual Conference on Women's Problems, where she spoke on women's role in the future of aviation. Elliot, an ardent supporter of women's educational rights, felt that Earhart could "find . . . the eventual solution to the problem of careers for women." As a visiting professor, much of Earhart's time was devoted to conferences with women students and lecturing around campus. In July 1936, Amelia acquired a new Lockheed Electra airplane she called her "Flying Laboratory," purchased with funds from the Purdue Research Foundation. With her new airplane, Amelia began planning a world flight at the equator, which commenced in 1937. In July of that year, Earhart's plane was declared missing en route from New Guinea to Howland Island, a small island which lies in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

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Carol A. Ecker (b. 1940) graduated from the School of Veterinary Medicine in 1964, one of the first of two women graduates in the school. Her success as a student carried over into her professional life, where she became president of the Clayview Animal Clinic, owner and operator of Clayview farms, secretary-treasurer of Ecker Enterprises and owner of Marcell's Pet Salon. Ecker also helped establish the Purdue Veterinary Alumni Association, where she served as secretary-treasurer. She later went on to serve on the Dean's Advisory Council of the School of Veterinary Medicine, and in 1988, became a member of the Purdue Board of Trustees. In addition to being involved in several professional organizations, Ecker also intitiated the Twin City Therapy animal bonding program, and has remained active on the Purdue campus in a number of student and career-oriented programs.

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Ewing was born in Broome County, New York in 1838. She married W.P. Ewing in 1863. After the Civil War, Ewing gained national recognition as a cooking instructor and became known as "the woman who would have taught America to make good bread if America could have been taught." Emma authored several books such as, Cooking and Castle-building (1880), Soup and Soup-making (1882), and A Text-book of Cookery, for Use in Schools (1899). In 1882, she established the Chicago School of Cookery. Ewing came to Iowa State University in 1884 as the leader of the Domestic Economy Department; however, she left after little success with the program and came to Purdue University in 1887. At Purdue, Ewing attempted to institute a cooking course for the female students. Her efforts were unsuccessful, as the women at Purdue showed little interest. Pike's mission was not to make all women housewives, but rather to educate those who were so inclined. As she said, "It is not the mission of every woman to do housework. All women are not called housekeepers. But it is of paramount importance that every woman who attempts to preside over a household should be thoroughly instructed in the domestic arts." By 1891, Ewing had left Purdue and was involved as both the Dean of the Chautauqua Assembly in New York and as a traveling lecturer. In 1892, she formed the Housekeepers' National League to improve training in the domestic sciences. In addition, she founded the Model Home School of Household Economics in 1898, which was affiliated with Marietta College in Ohio.

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Fitzsimmons earned bachelor's degrees in Journalism and Home Economics from Iowa State University in 1928. She also received her MS from the University of Illinois with a thesis entitled, "Some Contributions of Economic Theory to Home Economics." In 1945, Fitzsimmons earned her PhD in Economics with minors in Sociology and Home Management from the University of Illinois. As a student, Fitzsimmons was involved in organizations such as Phi Kappa Phi, Omicron Nu, and Mortar Board. She was also a member of the American Home Economics Association, the American Economics Association, and the American Sociological Association. After completing her education, Fitzsimmons joined the Purdue faculty in 1946 as a professor and the Head of the Department of Home Management. She held this position until her retirement in 1968. During her career, Fitzsimmons was active within her field and was awarded numerous prizes. She authored and co-authored several books and is credited with introducing the field of family economics to the Purdue curriculum, thereby helping to create what is now known as the College of Consumer and Family Sciences.

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Eliza Hawkins Fowler was Purdue's first major women benefactor. In 1901, she gave $70,000 in funding to the University for construction of the first assembly hall, the largest single gift to the University since John Purdue's contribution in 1869. Fowler Hall became a "campus showcase," used for orientations, convocations, lectures, and the first indoor commencement exercises. Although it was demolished in 1954 in order to make room for a campus conference center, the tradition of Fowler Hall lives on in the Stewart Center auditorium which bears Eliza Fowler's name, located in almost the same location as the original structure.

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Originally from Toledo, Ohio, Gates graduated with a BS from Purdue in 1903. Her senior thesis is titled, "The Formations of Cork in Woody Stems and its Effect on the Peripheral Tissues." Nicknamed "Goo Goo" by her classmates, Gates was active in the Philalethean Literary Society and served as Exchange Editor for the Exponent student newspaper. She also received her MS at Purdue and then underwent further training at the Toledo Manual Training School. In 1914, she was employed as a science teacher at Toledo Central High School in Ohio. An article she wrote, "Some Health Conditions Existing Among Our High School Girls," was published in 1919. When the new Edmund D. Libbey High School was opened in 1923, Gates became the Head of the Science Department.

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From Lafayette, Indiana, Gault graduated with a BS from Purdue in 1928. She was involved with several student clubs such as the Spanish Club, the Eurodelphian Society, the Y.W.C.A., and the Sophomore Commission.

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Geddes was born and raised in Houston Texas. She received a BS in Nursing in 1957 and a PhD in Biophysics in 1970 from the University of Houston. In 1975, Geddes came to Purdue University and served as the Assistant Head of the Purdue School of Nursing. At the time of her arrival, no nursing faculty members had doctorates. Geddes became the Head of the Purdue School of Nursing in 1980, a position she held until 1991. As Geddes recalls, "Nursing throughout the country was beginning to become a sort of a sleeping giant that was beginning to move and wake up. And so when I came here, one of my biggest challenges was to try to bring what I call 20th century nursing into this community." This task included challenging traditional perceptions of nurses as merely doctors' assistants who were wrongly believed to have no expertise or skill for diagnosis and treatment. In addition, Geddes was also instrumental in instituting a four-year nursing baccalaureate program and starting the Freshman Scholars, a program that provided scholarships to outstanding incoming freshman. For her efforts in the classroom, Geddes has been recognized with a number of awards, including the James Dwyer Outstanding Teacher Award, the Amoco Foundation Teaching Award for best undergraduate teaching in Purdue University, and the Helen B. Schleman Award for providing leadership to female undergraduate students. Geddes name has also been entered into Purdue's Book of Great Teachers, and she is a member of Purdue's Teaching Academy. Geddes speaks of her students stating, "To see how they have grown and matured, that's my reward." Geddes retired in 2004.

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Carolyn Gery began working at Purdue University in 1972. Since that time she has served as the Associate Vice President of Development and as the Executive Director of the President's Council. She has assisted in major fundraising efforts for the university. Her involvement with the President's Council since its 1972 inception has helped the organization grow to its current membership of sixteen thousand individuals, many of whom have helped raise millions of dollars for Purdue University. She retired from Purdue in 2008.

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Lillian Moller Gilbreth, widely known as the "Mother of Modern Management," came to Purdue in 1935 as a visiting professor at Purdue's School of Industrial Engineering. Already a prominent industrial engineer, author, and widowed mother of twelve children, Gilbreth was hired by President Elliott with the intention of "introducing new forces for the. . .effective education of young women." Gilbreth lived on campus in the women's residence halls during her lecturing and consulting periods at Purdue, and helped improve the motion study labs on campus, making them more accessible to the local agricultural industry. Upon her retirement in 1948, she was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Industrial Psychology degree. She left the Gilbreth Engineering Library to Purdue University, a collection consisting of approximately 1500 volumes plus research notes relating to her husband Frank's time and motion studies. Lillian Gilbreth also holds a distinguished place for having been named the first female member of the American Society for Mechanical Engineers in 1926.

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Gleiter graduated with a BS in Chemical Engineering from Purdue in 1960. Despite her hard work, Gleiter was virtually ignored when she entered the job market because of her gender. After taking a long leave from engineering, Gleiter returned decided to return to her professional life in 1980 and became involved in a National Science Foundation program that was geared toward supporting women who were re-entering the engineering field. Gleiter also began her work for an MS in Systems Management and Technical Systems from the University of Southern California. Despite having spent 20 years away from a rapidly developing field, Gleiter soon proved herself to be a capable and successful engineer. Through her employment at Aerospace Corp., Gleiter was responsible for half of a billion dollars worth of satellite software and received numerous awards and much praise. Gleiter retired as a project engineer in 2004 and went on to become the co-founder and CEO of the Global Institute for Technology and Engineering (GIFTE), an organization that strives to improve the status of women in the technology and engineering workforce.

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Eva Goble was born on May 28, 1910 in southern Clay County and attended school in Jasonville, Indiana where she participated in girls' basketball and was instrumental in starting her high school's first library. Goble started college at Indiana State University, but had to leave school for work when the stock market crashed in 1929. She eventually was able to return to Indiana State University and graduated from the Teaching College in 1941. She worked for Purdue Extension services from 1941 until being named Dean of Home Economics in 1967, a position she held until her retirement in 1973. Goble was also state leader of the Indiana Extension Homemakers Association from 1947 to 1973. She received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Indiana State University in 1968. In 1972, she received one of the first Frederick L. Hovde Awards for Excellence in Educational Service to the Rural People of Indiana. Purdue's College of Consumer and Family Sciences established the Eva Goble Lecture Series in 1992, and Dean Goble, now emeritus, received an honorary doctorate from Purdue in 1999.

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Born in 1935 to two Purdue educators (Marguerite Hall-Albjerg and Victor Lincoln Albjerg), Graham earned her BA with highest distinction from Purdue University in 1955. In 1964, she earned her PhD from Columbia University and then spent several years working as an educator and counselor in Virginia and New York. Having held appointments at Indiana University, Northern Michigan University, and Columbia University's Teachers College, Graham joined the faculty at Harvard University and served as the Dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Independent Study at Harvard University, the vice president for Institutional Planning for Radcliffe College, and the vice president of Radcliffe College. She left Harvard in 1977 after she was appointed president of the National Institute of Education by the President of the United States. She later returned to Harvard in 1979 and became the Charles Warren Professor of the History of American Education. In 1982, she became the Dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, the first woman to be appointed dean of a Harvard faculty. Graham retired from her deanship in 1991 and served as the President of the Spencer Foundation from 1991 until 2000. In 2009, Graham was elected Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

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Haas was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1926. She received her BS from Brooklyn College in 1947. She later matriculated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where she received her MS in 1949 and her PhD in 1951, both of which were in mathematics. While at MIT, Violet was introduced to her future husband, Felix. After school, Haas taught at the University of Connecticut, Wayne State University, and the University of Detroit. She came to Purdue University in 1962, where she joined the faculty as an assistant professor in the College of Electrical Engineering and Computing Engineering. By 1977 she had become a full professor of Electrical Engineering and had published numerous scholarly articles in the areas of optimal control, nonlinear control, and optimal estimation. Haas also garnered numerous awards for her research and teaching excellence, including the National Science Foundation Science Faculty Fellowship, the A.A.U.W. Vassie James Hill Fellowship, the D.D. Ewing Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and the Helen B. Schleman Gold Medallion Award. In addition, Haas served as a role model and counselor to many female students. She and fellow professor Carolyn Perrucci co-edited a book entitled Women in Scientific and Engineering Professions in 1984. Haas continued to work at Purdue until her death in 1986. The Council on the Status of Women established the Violet B. Haas award in her honor in 1990 to recognize individuals who have helped to promote the status of women at Purdue.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Marshall (1883-1956) was born near Lafayette, Indiana on October 6, 1883. She grew up on her father's farm and attended Purdue at the turn of the century, graduating with a BA in 1904. After college she pursued a career in art, attending the Art Institute of Chicago, making three trips to Paris, and studying a full year at the Academie Moderne in France. Upon finishing her education, Harcoff could not find work as an art educator, despite her credentials. Instead, she began working as a painter of porcelain for the famous retailer Marshall Fields in Chicago. After earning enough money, Harcoff took a trip west on the Santa Fe Railroad in 1913. She chose to exit the train in Arizona and spent the summer with a tribe of Hopi Native Americans, sharing in their lifestyle and painting them. At the end of the summer, she returned to Chicago by train and began her life as a professional artist. One of her earliest exhibitions was in 1914 at the Purdue University Library. She married Constantine Harcoff in 1916, the same year she took a six week sketching trip through Este Park, Colorado, Yellowstone Park, and Shoshone Canyon as a guest of the Burlington Railroad. In 1927, she moved from the Midwest to Santa Barbara, California permanently and eventually opened her own studio. Her work has been exhibited in numerous galleries and shows both in the Midwest and in California.

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Ivy Frances Harner, professor of Household Economics, was instrumental in establishing the home economics department at Purdue in the early 1900s. After earning a B.S. and M.S. from Kansas Agricultural College, she studied domestic science in Europe from 1904-1905 and later went on to serve as head of the Domestic Science Department of the Louisiana Industrial Institute. She came to Purdue in 1905 when President Winthrop Stone realized that Purdue should offer to women "opportunities comparable in scientific and technical value with those enjoyed by men." The 1907 Debris yearbook describes the early home economics department as a four years' course which involves the "economical and scientific study of such subjects as food principles. . .classification of food, chemical and microscopic composition of food, application of heat to food principles, economical and nutritive value of foods. . .food preservation and adulteration and dietetics."

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Hatt was the daughter of the prominent Head of the School of Civil Engineering, William Kendrick Hatt. She spent her freshman year at Vassar College, her sophomore and junior years at Purdue, and then transferred back to Vassar to graduate in 1922. While at Purdue, Hatt was involved in organizations such as the Exponent student newspaper and Kappa Alpha Theta. In 1923, she began studying at George Washington University, where she earned her MA. During that time, she also traveled to Geneva, Switzerland to study vocation psychology under Professor Edouard Claparede at the University of Geneva. Upon graduation, Elise returned to Purdue for four years and was employed by the university to study problems in higher education. She was appointed as a National Fellow in Child Development in 1927 and attended both the Merrill-Palmer School in Detroit and the Teachers' College at Columbia University. She joined the staff of the Merrill-Palmer School in 1928, researching child development and helping to coordinate data that the school had gathered on its child participants.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Sarah (Allen) Oren Haynes (1836-1907) came to Purdue in 1875 as the first female faculty member of the university. Her title, which initially was "female teacher of the university," was changed to assistant professor of mathematics until she was appointed as a professor of botany soon after being hired. Among her undertakings, Haynes presented the university with plans for a campus orchard with which to conduct experimental work, assisted in formulating the rules of student conduct, and, in 1876, became the overseer of the first women's literary society at Purdue. Sarah Oren and her teenage daughter, Cata, lived on campus in two rooms of the Boarding Hall (Ladies Hall) until 1878, when Oren resigned from Purdue in order to marry Wesley Haines. Among her other accomplishments, Sarah Oren also held the position of becoming the first woman state librarian for Indiana in 1873. In addition to being Indiana's first woman state librarian and Purdue's first female faculty member, Oren was also the first faculty member, male or female, to receive a board of trustees citation in appreciation of her work for the university.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Hazelton came to Purdue as the head of the Department of Women's Physical Education when it was established in 1929. Prior to arriving at Purdue, Hazelton had received her BA from Mount Holyoke College in 1916. She then earned professional training in the Department of Hygiene at Wellesley College. Hazelton began teaching at Northwestern University for four years, followed by a five-year stint at Minnesota University. While working, Hazelton returned to school and received a Master's degree from the Teachers College at Columbia University in 1929. Once she came to Purdue, Hazelton worked to expand and improve the fledgling Department of Women's Physical Education. Starting out with two instructors, the program soon had five. In addition, Hazelton expanded the number of sports classes that were offered for credit and emphasized the importance of well-roundedness by teaching both physical education classes and supervising extracurricular sports. By the early 1930s, Purdue coeds were able to earn a state teacher's license in the field of physical education. As one student wrote, Professor Hazelton "has won the respect and admiration of all women, whether interested in physical education or not. As the director of this department she has been associated with every women of the University." In addition to her responsibilities as an educator, Hazelton was also the Chairman of the National Section on Women's Athletics of the American Physical Education Association.

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Jamieson attended MIT and received her BS in Mathematics in 1972. She later studied at Princeton University and received her MS and PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. She joined the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University in 1976 and has since become the most senior female faculty member in the College of Engineering. Jamieson has been the recipient of several awards including the Ransburg Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the John A. Edwardson Dean of the College of Engineering, and the National Science Foundation Director's Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars. Jamieson also she co-founded and directed the Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS) program, which allows teams of undergraduate students to earn academic credit while working on multiyear, multidisciplinary projects involving engineering and technology. She has authored more than 160 scholarly articles and conference papers and has co-edited books, including The Characteristics of Parallel Algorithms. For all of her achievements, Jamieson was named one of 15 women in the inaugural class of Women Pioneers of Purdue University by the Purdue University Council on the Status of Women in 2006.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Helen Johnson came to Purdue in 1962 to spearhead Purdue's first nursing program. In her first year at Purdue, she was able to secure outside funding, hire faculty, arrange sites for clinicals, develop a curriculum, and secure state approval for the new program. Over the next three years, she initiated nursing programs on all of Purdue's regional campuses. By 1969, the programs had become accredited by the National League of Nursing and each had graduating classes. Johnson spent the next 18 years at Purdue continually improving upon the program which she had started. One of her most significant achievements involved obtaining a $1.3 million grant from the United States Public Health Service which funded construction of a new nursing building on the West Lafayette campus. This achievement eventually led to the department's formation into its own school with a separate operating budget. Her strong desire for the nursing school to develop a master's degree program propelled her to earn a doctorate in higher education in 1975. In 1979, Johnson was named head of the School of Nursing. She retired in 1980.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Johnson (1859-1921) was born on August 20,1859 to L. Milford and Mary Brown of Lafayette, Indiana. In 1883, she enrolled in special courses at Purdue University, taking wood carving, decorative design, and historical ornament. She married Oscar D. Johnson in 1886, and they had two sons, Harold Brown Johnson and Maxwell Oscar Johnson. Johnson appears to have gone to college in 1876 to Auburn, New York. She was interested in art, cooking, interior decorating, and served at least one year as President of the Art Club of Lafayette in 1914-1915. Johson's son Maxwell Oscar Johnson graduated with a BS from School of Chemical engineering at Purdue University in 1913. He returned to Purdue in 1928 to continue his studies, and eventually became an internationally known scientist for his research on the pineapple.

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Johnson attended Reed College in 1928 after learning that a physicist there, A.A. Knowlton, was one of the winners of the Oersted Medal from the American Association of Physics Teachers. Johnson subsequently received her BA degree in 1932, though she studied a great deal of physics while in college. Afterwards, she came to Purdue University and earned her MS and PhD in Atomic Physics in 1937 while working as an assistant in the Physics Department. During her career, Johnson published more than fifty professional papers and edited and wrote pieces for academic volumes. She also wrote a biography about the head of the Purdue Physics Department titled Karl Lark-Horkovitz: Pioneer in Solid State Physics. Johnson was awarded a Charles B. Murphy Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching Award in 1972-1973. Johnson's name was also entered into the Purdue University Book of Great Teachers. In 1979, the year of her retirement from Purdue, Johnson was made a Professor Emeritus of Physics and received a Helen B. Schleman Gold Medallion Award.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Kay was born on a farm in Huntington County, Indiana in 1917. She attended Purdue in the 1930s and lived in Duhme Hall (originally the south hall of Windsor Halls) at the same time that both Amelia Earhart and Lillian Moller Gilbreth were in residence as counselors and faculty members. Influenced by one of her high school teachers, Kay chose to major in institution management. After graduating from Purdue in 1939 with a BS in Home Economics, she was hired by the Purdue Memorial Union as the assistant food supervisor. During this time, she also met William Jamieson Kay, her future husband and a graduate student in civil engineering, and they were married in November 4, 1941. After her children were old enough to begin school in 1954, Kay began working for the Purdue residence halls. She continued managing the residence halls' dining courts for twenty-six years.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Bertha Keller was hired at Purdue as an instructor in the Department of Physical Education for Women in 1929. She worked under Helen W. Hazelton and was in charge of summer program sessions. In addition, she served as the faculty advisor to the Women's Athletic Association and the Purdue Archers Club and supervised health examinations and a program to promote individual health. In 1932, Keller took a leave of absence to study at the Teachers College at Columbia University in order to earn her MA. By 1934, she had published a work entitled Posture for Women. She resigned from Purdue in 1935.

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A native of Lafayette, Indiana, Kennedy graduated from Purdue in 1911 with a BS in Science. She graduated after three years of studying and worked in the Registrar's office during all three years. She was also a member of the Purdue Girls' Club and served as class secretary her first year. In the student yearbook, classmates wrote of her, "Contrary Mary got her start by instigating an unsettled argument on Woman's Suffrage and she is willing to expound her theories at any time."

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Originally from Lafayette, Indiana, Kern attended Purdue and was extremely active as a student. Before graduating from Purdue in 1927 with a BS, she participated in several clubs, including Mortar Board, Kappa Alpha Theta, the Eurodelphian Literary Society, the Exponent, the Girls' Glee Club, the staff of the Debris student yearbook, the Purdue Girls' Club, the Harlequin Club, and was listed as a Distinguished Student. After graduation, Kern remained involved with the Purdue community as an editor for the Purdue Alumnus magazine.

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Callie Ann Khouri is an award-winning screenplay writer, film producer, and author. Her best known work includes the screenplay for the 1991 film Thelma and Louise and the 2002 screen adaptation of Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood. Khouri, a native of Kentucky, initially studied landscape architecture at Purdue in the late 1970s, and then developed an interest in drama. After continuing her studies at the Strasbourg Institute, she gained experience as an actor, theater apprentice, and waiter in Nashville, Tennessee. She has also been involved in the production of music videos for performers Robert Cray, Alice Cooper, and the Commodores, an experience which she has cited as seminal in her writing career.

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King was a Purdue student and an activist during the 1960s. She was a senior majoring in speech therapy in 1968. King participated in the Mortar Board, was one of the first of two black Purdue cheerleaders, and also engaged in protests against racial discrimination. During the 1967-1968 football and basketball games, King raised the Black Salute during the playing of the national anthem. In December 1967, she and the other cheerleaders were barred from entering the floor at a basketball game against Ohio University. King in turn quit the cheerleading squad and filed a complaint through the Dean of Men's office. In addition to her experiences at Purdue, King was also involved in activism throughout the community. She had arranged to speak at Sunnyside Junior High School on "Black Power and Black History" in 1969, but filed a formal complaint against the school's principal after her engagement was canceled.

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Knudson was born on June 1, 1932 in Washington. Her parents, James and Ruth Ellsworth Knudson, had six children. Knudson spent some time in high school in Alexandria, Virginia. In 1954, she graduated with a BA from Brigham Young University and later received an MA from the University of Georgia in 1955. She taught high school English in Miami and Key West, Florida before earning her PhD at Stanford University in 1967. Afterwards, Knudson taught English at colleges such as Purdue University, Adelphi University, and York College of the City University of New York. After putting together an anthology of sports poetry, an editor urged her to write a book about sports, because "There aren't any women writing about women athletes." As an athlete herself, Knudson played baseball, tennis, football, and jogged well into her 60s. The characters in the books she wrote were women who participated in sports that were traditionally dominated by men. Knudson especially gained recognition for her "Zan" series, including titles such as Zanballer (1972), Zanbanger (1977), and Zanboomer (1978). In addition, Knudson also wrote biographies of famous sports stars and collaborated with nationally prominent poet, May Swenson, on a collection of sports poems.

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Christine M. Ladisch was appointed Dean of Purdue University's College of Health and Human Sciences (HHS) on January 7, 2013, and served as the Inaugural Dean of the college since July 1, 2010. Prior to her appointments as Dean and Inaugural Dean, she served as Purdue's Vice Provost for Academic Affairs since July 2005, and as Associate Provost since 2001, where she provided leadership in undergraduate education and dealt with matters of personnel, budget, academic planning, program evaluation, promotion and tenure, and general academic policy development and implementation. Her direct reports included the Center for Instructional Excellence, the Oral English Proficiency Program, the University Honors Program, the Undergraduate Studies Program and the Entrepreneurship Certificate Program. From 2008-2010, she led with co-chair Mark Pagano, the West Lafayette campus' preparation and self-study for institutional reaccreditation review. Purdue received the full 10-year re-accreditation with no follow-up requirements. Ladisch and Pagano both received Purdue's One Brick Higher Award for their leadership role in the accreditation process. Dr. Ladisch has been a member of the faculty in the Department of Consumer Science since 1979. She received her Ph.D. and M.S. from Purdue University and the baccalaureate degree from Indiana State University. Her research focuses on cellulose chemistry and biotechnology applications for textile products. She has received departmental, school and university-level awards for teaching excellence, is a member of the Teaching Academy and listed in Purdue's Book of Great Teachers. In 2003, she received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Purdue's former College of Consumer and Family Sciences.

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Kristena LaMar grew up in Lafayette, Indiana, and received her BA with Honors from Purdue in 1970. During her collegiate years, she was president of Alpha Lambda Delta, director of the Student Volunteer Corps, a member of the Gold Peppers and Mortar Board honor societies, and chosen as "Miss Purdue 1968." She received her J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School in 1973. After law school, she became a legal aid attorney in Portland, Oregon with VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America), a national service program fighting poverty. Following her VISTA service, she was an attorney in private practice, specializing in family, juvenile, probate, and tax law until 1981, when she served as co-counsel to the Oregon State Judiciary Committee. After the session ended, she became the juvenile court's referee, serving first part-time and then full time, until she successfully ran for a Circuit Court Judge seat in 1984. During her judicial career, she developed the court's settlement conference program, was chair of the Arbitration and Mediation Commissions, and served fifteen years as a faculty member of the National Judicial College. She published several books and articles, taught in many states and foreign countries, and received awards from the Oregon State Bar Alternative Dispute Resolution System, the Classroom Law Project and the Willamette University Center for Dispute Resolution. She retired in October, 2009, after twenty-five years on the bench, the longest serving woman in the Oregon court system.

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Latta was the daughter of Professor William C. Latta. She graduated from Purdue in 1907 with a BS in Science. Her thesis is titled Materials for a History of Tippecanoe County, Indian. While at Purdue, she was involved with organizations such as the Philalethean Literary Society, the Tennis Club, and was on the staff of the Exponent student newspaper. Though Purdue's Home Economics Department was not founded until the year after Latta had graduated, she proceeded to create a short course in home economics at the Fairmount Academy in Fairmount, Indiana. After teaching high school for several years, Latta became the Indiana State Supervisor of Home Economics Education for seven years. By 1924, Latta had become interested in the insurance industry. She worked in Lafayette for a few months before becoming the district manager of the Peoria Life at the South Bend office. In 1926, she established a branch in the Lafayette district and acted as head.

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Long was born in Newport, Kentucky in 1883. She earned a special diploma (1908), BS (1921), and MA (1932) from Teachers College at Columbia University. In 1935, she received a PhD from Western Reserve University and began teaching Home Economics and Child Development at numerous schools such as the Bradley Institute, Wittenberg College, Antioch College, and Rock Hill South Carolina State College for Women. Long also served as the Director of Adult Education at Putnam Training School from 1935 until she accepted a position with Purdue University's Division of Education and Applied Psychology in 1938. Long published numerous articles and textbooks on behavior throughout her career. She passed away in Lafayette, Indiana on September 25, 1951.

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Anne Mae Lutz graduated from Purdue with BS and MS degrees in Biology in 1890 and 1891. In 1932, she became one of the first women to receive an honorary doctorate from Purdue for her contributions to genetics research. Among her achievements, Lutz specialized in documenting B chromosomes in plants and was an expert in the area of chromosomes of Oenothera mutants and hybrids.

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Mallon was born on January 1, 1890, in Bloomington, Illinois. She went through public schools in Chicago before earning her BS from the Institute of Technology, Chicago, in 1915. She earned her MS (1916) and PhD (1926) in Nutrition from the University of Chicago. Mallon came to Purdue in 1918 as an instructor in Foods and Nutrition, and was promoted to associate professor in 1934 upon the completion of her PhD. She resigned from Purdue in 1936 after accepting a position as an assistant professor in home economics at the University of California, Los Angeles. Through her research on nutrition, Mallon addressed issues related to calcium and its retention in the body. She wrote numerous academic articles on the subject, many of which were printed in publications such as Biological Chemistry, Journal of Home Economics, Journal of the American Dietetic Association, and others. Mallon passed away in 1968.

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Davies was born in Paris, where she competed for and won a scholarship in the Ecole Normale Superieure at a young age. She eventually received her degree from the University of France and became a French professor at the Bridgewater Ladies' College, which is an affiliate of Cambridge University. She also served as a professor of French and general history at Findlay College in Ohio from 1885 through 1895, during which time she received her PhD. She also taught at Milwaukee College, Downer College, and Bay View Summer University before she was hired by Purdue in 1896. She taught French until 1914, when she retired under the provisions of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. As a professor who challenged her students, Davies evinced mixed emotions. As her student wrote, "To Freshmen, Madame is the source of sleepless nights, but the upper classes always find her a true and interested friend." She died in 1930 at her summer home in Michigan. She was 81 years old.

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Martinez was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Her mother was a dance instructor who taught flamenco and ran a dance studio in their home. Martinez's grandmother, a journalist and active member of a political party, also lived with the family. Martinez lists "music and political discussions" as two influential aspects of her youth. Martinez came to the United States and eventually earned an MS in Counseling and Guidance and a PhD in Counseling Psychology from the University of Madison-Wisconsin. Before graduating with her doctorate, Martinez served as a psychology intern for the University of Wisconsin-Madison Counseling and Consultation Services. After completing her education, Martinez came to Purdue and served as an Assistant Dean of Students for eight years. During that time, she organized and oversaw the special support services for Purdue's minority students. After leaving Purdue, Martinez became a professional counselor for the Madison College Counseling and Conflict Managing Services. She has also been involved with the Madison College Intercultural Council and acts as an advisor for the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society and for Latino Pride. In 2004, Martinez was nominated for and won the Madison College Outstanding Employee of the year award.

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Mason was born and raised in Indianapolis, Indiana. Her father, Charles DeBow, was a member of the Tuskegee Airmen who helped sue the federal government in order to win African Americans the right to fly military combat airplanes during World War II. Mason began her career in education as a public school teacher in Chicago, followed by a period of working as a community college instructor. She later worked as the minority affairs director for Indiana University's School of Dentistry in Indianapolis and became the statewide director of educational opportunity for the central office of Indiana Vocational Technical College. Through the "Hoosier Plan for Minority Enforcement" program, Mason helped to increase the number of minority students and faculty at the eight Indiana University campuses. She was also the co-founder of the Indiana Coalition of Blacks in Higher Education. In 1993, Mason came to Purdue University as the Director of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs, a position that she held until 1997. Myra believed that "Americans shouldn't have to ask to be treated with respect." As a result of that belief, she was instrumental in drafting the Purdue University anti-harassment policy of 1994 that has since become a model for other universities. Mason's advice to students is to maintain their unique identities, learn from people and experiences as well as from books, believe in themselves, and achieve self-actualization.

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Mason received a BS in Zoology from the University of Kentucky in 1972. She then went on to receive an MS in Developmental Biology from Purdue University in 1974 and a PhD in Cellular, Molecular, and Developmental Biology from the University of Arizona in 1978. She then did postdoctoral research at Indiana University before beginning her employment at the University of Kansas in 1980. In 2001, Mason left her position at Kansas to become the first female Provost at Purdue University. During her time as Provost, Mason was responsible for planning, managing, and overseeing all academic programs at Purdue's West Lafayette campus and its four affiliated branch campuses in Indiana. In 2007, Mason was offered the presidency of the University of Iowa, which she accepted. Throughout her career as an academician, Mason has published numerous scholarly articles and has received grants from organizations such as the National Institutes of Health, the Wesley Research Foundation, the Lilly Endowment, and the National Science Foundation. Mason also has been appointed to the National Medal of Science Committee for two terms (2006-2011) by the President of the United States.

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Mary Lockwood Matthews, adopted daughter of agricultural pioneer Virginia Meredith, joined the Purdue faculty in 1910 as an extension home economics instructor. In 1912, she was named head of the Department of Household Economics, which expanded to become the School of Home Economics in 1926, of which she was founding dean. Matthews was instrumental in the creation of a home economics building, constructed in 1922 and named in her honor. The School has since been described as a "strong pillar of American home economics education." Mary Matthews is also credited for the invention of "Master Mix," a concoction created in the home economics labs at Purdue which was utilized by homemakers for the quick and easy preparation of baked goods. After serving at Purdue nearly fifty years as a faculty member, Mathews retired in 1958, earning the title Dean Emeritus.

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Jill Sutton McCormick (1916-1989) was an accomplished pilot and aviation professor at Purdue University. A graduate of Sullins College and Columbia University, McCormick learned to fly during World War II as a member of WASP (the Women's Air Force Service Pilots). During her twenty-six month tenure as a ferry pilot, McCormick flew twenty-three types of military aircraft, including both transport and fighter aircraft. After being discharged when the WASP organization disbanded in 1944, McCormick remained in the U.S. Air Force Reserve as a major. McCormick also flew a/or provided training for Eastern Airlines, Trans World Airlines, and Flying Tiger Lines before eventually coming to Purdue as a flight instructor. As the first full-time instructor in the Professional Pilot Program established in 1955, McCormick taught most of the aviation lecture courses and instructed procedures for the Link flight trainers (and later versions of flight simulators). In addition to her professional commitment to Purdue and the miscellaneous commercial airlines for which she worked, McCormick was also an active member of the Ninety-Nines, the premier women's aviation organization. In the peak of her career as a flight instructor, McCormick was honored with a Women's Achievement Award (1962) from the Lafayette Business and Professional Women's Club and an Amelia Earhart Memorial Scholarship (1964) from the Ninety-Nines. In addition, President Lyndon Johnson appointed her to the Women's National Aviation Advisory Board for the 1964-1966 term.

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Marylu McEwen is a prominent scholar in student development theory, working specifically in theories of student development for students of color. She also focuses on multiculturalism in student affairs and higher education. These research and teaching foci developed from an early emphasis on women's issues and development in graduate school that later expanded to focus more broadly on diversity, multiculturalism and social justice. McEwen is currently an Associate Professor Emerita in the College of Education at the University of Maryland at College Park where she spent twenty-one years in the Department of Counseling and Personnel Services. Prior to her tenure at the University of Maryland, McEwen was a member of the faculty at Auburn University in the Counselor Education Program for twelve years. McEwen earned both her Bachelor of Science (mathematics) and her doctorate (Counseling and Personnel Services) from Purdue University, in addition to her M.S.Ed. from Indiana University (College Student Personnel Administration). While finishing her PhD, McEwen worked as an intern in the Office of the Dean of Women at Purdue. Upon receiving her doctorate in 1972, McEwen completed a two year term as the Assistant Dean of Women there. In addition to many publications and presentations over the course of her career, McEwen has placed an emphasis on the importance of mentorship and guidance of her students. She has also remained highly active in her field by maintaining membership in numerous professional organizations and honor societies, as well as accepting leadership positions in service to the university and professional associations.

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Kathryn McHale (1889-1956), known as a "Hoosier with a national reputation as a crusader for women's rights," served on the Board of Trustees for Purdue from 1937-1946. After having served as a professor of education at the University of Minnesota, Columbia University, and Goucher College in Baltimore, McHale became general director of the American Association for University Women. One of her most widely recognized achievements involved developing a vocational interest test designed to help students, particularly women, determine career paths. She also directed a study involving women's colleges, which resulted in a publication that is considered a landmark in higher education literature. As a Purdue Board of Trustee member, McHale was one of the first to interview Frederick Hovde in 1945 in a search which resulted in his future presidency of the University.

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Emma McRae (1848-1919) came to Purdue in 1887 as a professor of English literature and "Lady Principal," having had extensive experience working in high schools throughout the state. She was educated at Brookville College and received her Master of Arts degree from Wooster College (Ohio) in 1896. McRae, known affectionately on campus as "Mother McRae," served unofficially in the capacity of counselor to women students at Purdue. Upon her retirement in 1912, McRae became one of the first staff members to receive a Carnegie Foundation retirement grant. She was an active member of the National association of Teachers and the State Association of Teachers, and contributed articles on educational issues to school periodicals. Carolyn Shoemaker, the notable Purdue alumna who became Dean of Women in 1913, has attributed much her academic and professional success to the influence of "Mother" McRae.

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Virginia Claypool Meredith's (1848-1936) involvement with Purdue began in 1899, while she was a speaker for the Farmers' Institutes, offering lectures across Indiana that were aimed to educate farmers on the latest science and technology in agriculture. These lectures, along with Meredith's unrelenting petitioning of Purdue presidents, were highly influential in paving the way for a home economics department in 1905. In addition to being a pioneer in agricultural education, organizer of the Indiana Federation of Women's Clubs, and editor of the Breeders Gazette, Virginia Claypool Meredith also became the first woman to serve on the Board of Trustees at Purdue, a post which she held from 1921-1936. She was crowned "Queen of American Agriculture" in Vicksburg, Mississippi in 1881. The women's residence hall known as "Meredith Hall" is named in her memory.

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Metzler attended Purdue and was an active member of the student body. She served as the president of the Association for Women Students, through which she and other students petitioned Purdue's administration to initiate a guest hours policy in the dormitories. In addition, Metzler was one of a few female students who worked to change the curfew hours for female students. After graduating in 1970 with a BA in Political Science, Metzler then went on and earned her JD from Indiana University in 1974 and an MS in Organizational Development (MSOD) from American University. Metzler worked for several years at various jobs, including heading the Florida Rural Legal Service, acting as Chief Executive Officer of an international women's organization, provost and chief academic officer of Cedar Crest College, as adviser to the head administrator for federal labor-management relations, and senior manager in Presidential Personnel for the President of the United States. In 1994, President Bill Clinton nominated Metzler as Assistant Secretary of Labor for Administration and Management. By 1997, Metzler had become the Acting Secretary of Labor and oversaw the work of 16,000 Department of Labor employees. She was also a partner in the law firm of Pepper Hamilton LLP and the president of a consulting firm focused on improving the effectiveness of nonprofit organizations. In 2006, Metzler became the president and CEO of Experience Works, a national, charitable organization focused on training low-income seniors with employment skills.

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Eulora Jennings Miller (d. 1939) holds the distinguished place amongst Purdue alumnae as the first woman to graduate from the University in 1878. As an undergraduate, she also served as the first president of the Philalethean Society, an organization "effected for the literary needs of the young ladies at Purdue." Upon earning a Bachelor's of Science degree, Eulora Miller became Purdue's first professional librarian, and continued her career in librarianship at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. She went on to study at Columbia University in New York, and gained notoriety as a dramatist, having published four plays, including Mrs. Oakley's Telephone, Tom's Fiancee, Dinner at the Club, and Die Prinzessin Barnof.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Mitchell was born in Gary, Indiana, attended Toleston High School in Gary, and later went on to study the humanities at Purdue University. During her time at Purdue, Mitchell was very involved in scholastic activities and was an energetic participant in the civil rights movement. As she states, "Talk is therapeutic. Speak frankly, say what you think, and do so with a degree of honesty. If there is prejudice and bigotry, the best way to chop away at it is to recognize its existence." As a student, Mitchell organized a series of lectures on "The Black American" that were open to students, faculty, and local citizens for 15 weeks. She also spent 12 hours per week as a counselor to African American students at the Office of Black Student Affairs and an additional 40 hours per week involved in similar campus activities. For instance, she was the historian of the Mortar Board, a student senator, and was an active participant in the Gold Peppers, University Theater and the Purdue Readers. In 1968, Mitchell and fellow student Homer LaRue organized a large demonstration on Purdue's campus to protest racial inequalities. Numerous African American students quietly filed across Purdue's campus to Hovde Hall, Purdue's main administrative building, and symbolically laid bricks there.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Emily Mobley, Dean of the Libraries from 1989-2004, provided oversight in moving the system towards the electronic era and pushed for growth of library collections to 2.3 million volumes. In 1997, she was awarded the Esther Ellis Norton Distinguished Professorship in Library Science. Among her accomplishments, Mobley played a crucial role in the acquisition of the addition to the Amelia Earhart Collection to Purdue's Archives and Special Collections unit, led a two year renovation of the Humanities, Social Science & Education Library, and helped the English department bring a literary leader to campus each semester. Prior to coming to Purdue, Mobley was library director with General Motors Institute. She also served as a library administrator at Wayne State University, General Motors Research Laboratories and Chrysler Corporation. Mobley was also a past president of the Special Libraries Association and served on the board of directors for the Association of Research Libraries. She was the first African-American dean at Purdue.

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A native of South Bend, Indiana, Murphy graduated from Purdue in 1924 with a BS. During her time as an undergraduate, she was very involved with campus activities, including women's sports. Murphy played basketball and was a member of Theta Chi Gamma, Kappa Delta Pi, the Philalethean Literary Society, the Women's Athletic Association, the Woman's Press Club, the Purdue Girls' Club, the Purdue Union Club, and the staff of the Exponent student newspaper.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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A native of South Bend, Indiana, Murphy was a prominent student athlete in the early days of women's sports at Purdue. Graduating with a BS in 1929, Rosemary spent her undergraduate years involved in the Women's Athletic Association, and playing soccer, basketball, and baseball. She also took part in the coed track meets and was one of the highest scoring individuals. In 1927, Rosemary served as the President of the Women's Athletic Association and represented Purdue at the Athletic Conference of American College Women in Ithaca, New York. Outside of sports, Rosemary was also involved in Gold Peppers, Kappa Delta Pi, the Philalethean Literary Society, the Purdue Girls' Club, Alpha Lambda Delta, and Theta Chi Gamma. Murphy also won recognition as a Distinguished Student multiple times.

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Originally from West Virginia, Betty M. Nelson received a bachelor's degree in psychology and sociology from the Women's Division of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and then a master's degree in student personnel administration from Ohio University. She served over 30 years on the staff of Purdue University, beginning in the Psychology Department before being asked to join Helen Schleman's staff in the Office of the Dean of Women. She served as Assistant and Associate Dean before being appointed Dean of Students to succeed Barbara I. Cook in 1987. During the 1970s and 1980s, much of Nelson's administrative energy was focused on the civil rights of those with disabilities and ensuring that campus was an accessible place for all students, faculty, and staff members. She was instrumental in the creation of Adaptive Programs (now the Disability Resource Center), which formed in response to the needs of students with disabilities. Nelson founded and chaired the Advisory Council on Disability Issues, a faculty and student advisory group to raise awareness of disability issues in the classroom. She was also a charter member of the Association on Higher Education and Disabilities (AHEAD) and a founding member of the Indiana Higher Education Committee on Disabled Students (later named IN-AHEAD). In addition to her advocacy efforts for the disabled, Nelson was instrumental in the establishment of the Student Leadership Development Program in the Office of the Dean of Students. She served in leadership positions in the National Association for Women Deans, Advisors, and Counselors; the NAWDAC Foundation, and the Indiana AWDAC. Nelson is active in community service, having served in leadership roles with the Community Foundation of Greater Lafayette, the Lafayette Rotary Club (as its first woman president), the Lafayette YWCA, Leadership Lafayette, and other local service organizations. Since her retirement, Nelson has provided leadership for the Purdue University Retirees Association. Some of Dean Nelson's awards and honors include the Sagamore of the Wabash, the Grand Marquis de Lafayette Award for Community Service, the Helen B. Schleman Gold Medallion, and the Special Boilermaker Award.

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Norton is originally from Lafayette, Indiana and graduated with a BS from Purdue in 1927. While at Purdue, she participated in campus organizations such as Zeta Tau Alpha, the Y.W.C.A., and the Purdue Girls' Club. After graduation, Norton worked in governmental libraries and became an important benefactor of Purdue University. A distinguished professorship in the Purdue University Libraries was named in her honor.

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O'Shea studied at the University of Wisconsin, completing both her BS in 1916 and her MS in 1917. She then pursued a PhD from Columbia University. As a psychologist, she had a major influence on the application of psychology to families, children, counseling, psychotherapy, and schools. She came to Purdue in 1931 and was put in charge of the organization of a personnel service for women. She was also hired as an associate professor of Educational Psychology and Nursery School Administration. In 1933, she became an associate professor of Educational Psychology under the Department of Education. By 1964, she was named a Professor Emeritus of Psychology. As a professor, O'Shea taught courses on child and adolescent development, clinical psychology, and multiple general introductory psychology courses.

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Annie Smith Peck (1850-1935) was a Latin and elocution professor at Purdue from 1881-1883. Though her career at Purdue was brief, she earned recognition for her teaching skills from both students and faculty. Her real fame, however, involved her mountain-climbing capabilities, an interest she developed while pursuing classical studies in Germany. She scaled a number of moderate-sized mountains in Europe and in the United States, including Mount Shasta in California (14, 380 feet). In 1895, she climbed the Matterhorn, becoming the first woman, and quite possibly the first person ever, to do so. She was also the first American woman in the western hemisphere to climb higher than 18, 314 feet, upon scaling Mount Orizaba in Mexico. In addition to being a successful mountaineer, Peck was also an aggressive supporter of women's rights, planting a "Vote for Women" sign at the top of Mount Coropuna (21,250 feet) at the age of 61. She kept climbing until the age of 84, the year before her death. The Lima (Peru) Geographical Society has named a mountain peak in her honor. She is also the author of four guidebooks: A Search for the Apex of America: High Mountain Climbing in Peru and Bolivia (1912), The South American Tour (1913), Industrial and Commercial South America (1922), and Flying Over South America: Twenty Thousand Miles by Air (1932). Peck's last book, Flying Over South America, includes rich black and white pictures from her travels, ranging from aerial views of different landscapes to people, and it is argued that her adventure by flight was the longest made by any North American at the time. She also used her air travels to serve as an example to those who were skeptical or afraid to fly, as she states, "...it was merely a novel and delightful journey, on which I proceeded throughout the entire distance without a qualm." Peck also thoughtfully writes, "...in 1903, when I sailed for South America to climb one of the great peaks of the Andes, I did not dream of ever flying over or around them."

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Carolyn Perrucci is a Professor of Sociology at Purdue University and specializes in studying families, work, sex and gender, aging, and education. She earned a BS in Sociology from Middle Tennessee State University in 1961 and went on to earn her MS (1963) and PhD (1965) from Purdue University. During her time at Purdue, Perrucci has also served as the Chair and Co-Chair of the Women's Studies Department, Associate Dean of the Graduate School from 1992-1998, and was head of the Department of Sociology from 1998 until 2003. In 1991, she received the Violet Haas Recognition Award from the Council on the Status of Women at Purdue University. She also received an Outstanding Teaching Award from the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. The School of Liberal Arts at Purdue recognized Perrucci in 1997 as a distinguished alumna, and the Women's Studies Department honored Perrucci by endowing the Carolyn C. Perrucci Undergraduate Achievement Award.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Peterson is a Purdue alumna from Elmwood Park, Illinois. She graduated in 1965 with a BA in Humanities and Social Sciences. While at Purdue, Peterson was involved in Gold Peppers, the Green Guard, the Home Economics Chapter, Mock P, and Tomahawk.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Powers graduated in 1949 with a BS from the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics. After graduation, Powers engaged in numerous and varied professional activities. While her husband was in the military during the 1950s, Powers was active in the Civil Air Patrol and became a major and squadron leader. She also flew airplanes and worked as both a flight instructor and a check pilot. Due to the fact that women were not allowed to teach aviation in the military, Powers remained a civilian and instead taught aircraft, engines, and navigation to off-duty soldiers. She became the president and owner of both Test and Evaluation International Services, Inc. and of Shielding Technologies, Inc. She also served as the owner and president of T&E International, Inc. Beyond these achievements, Powers additionally pursued ice skating, tennis, and badminton professionally. When she was awarded as an outstanding alumna by Purdue's College of Engineering's Aerospace program, she said, "If I had a motto, it would be to never stop learning and to learn about things out of your field as well. Imagination is crucial, as is curiosity. Purdue taught me the mantra of engineers. . ."Take a problem, think it through, and find a solution." She was recognized as a Purdue "Old Master" in 1995, served on the Board of the NE Maryland Technology Council, was named in Who's Who in Science and Engineering, and was involved with the board of the Army Alliance, Inc. and the Hartford County (Maryland) Economic Development Advisory Board. Powers remained very active throughout her life and piloted a BT 13 airplane during a celebration by the Indiana Wing of the Commemorative Air Force in 2008. She passed away in 2009.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Rollock is Purdue's Vice President for Human Relations, a position she has held since 1999. A graduate of the Yale University School of Law (1984), Rollock has worked for firms in New York City and Indianapolis. In 1992, she was appointed associate professor of law at Indiana University-Bloomington, where her research and teaching were concentrated in the areas of corporate law, corporate finance, securities regulation, and professional responsibility. In July 1998, Rollock joined Purdue as Interim Vice President for Human Relations and an associate professor of management. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Lafayette-West Lafayette Economic Development Corporation and YMCA Camp Tecumseh.

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Rose came to Purdue from Rossville, Indiana. She graduated with a BS in 1922 and was an active student while on campus. Rose was the president of the Eurodelphian Literary Society, participated in the Purdue Girls' Club and the Home Economics Society, served as her class's Historian in her junior year, and was elected as the May Queen during her senior year. She also served as Class Secretary when she was a senior and was involved in the Y.W.C.A. and the Purdue Union.

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Helen Blanche Schleman (1902-1992), noted "unapologetic feminist," came to Purdue in 1934 as director of the first women's residence hall, subsequent to the razing of Ladies Hall in 1927. After taking a four-year leave of absence to serve in the Women's Coast Guard Reserve during World War II, Schleman returned to Purdue in 1947 as Dean of Women. She is acknowledged for having fought for women's rights at Purdue, including terminating the curfew for women students and spearheading a freshman conference program for women. Also during her tenure at Purdue, she earned a master's degree in education and psychology. Schleman retired as Dean of Women in 1968 and went on to become founder and first director of the Span Plan, a program which encourages adult students to continue or start their college careers. She remained an active member of the community until her death in 1992. Schleman Hall, which now houses the Purdue's Student Services department, is named in her honor.

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Schlundt earned her AB from the University of Missouri in 1927 with high honors. She then went on to earn a library science degree in 1929 from the University of Illinois. Schlundt came to Purdue University in 1929 and was hired as a general assistant in the library. In 1941, Schlundt worked as a cataloger. That summer she took a leave of absence from the university, so that she could finish a master's degree at the University of Michigan. By 1942, Schlundt was named the Head Cataloger of Purdue Libraries. She retired in 1965 from her position as Head of the Readers Services Administration at Purdue.

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Schwehn graduated from Olivet College in 1923 with a BA. She was hired by Purdue University in 1936 as a graduate assistant in the Physical Education for Women Department. During her years as a graduate assistant, Schwehn taught freshman and sophomore physical education classes, served as the faculty sponsor of Triton (the honorary swimming club for women), and was a hostess at W.R.H. South. In 1944, Schwehn became an assistant professor, and became an associate professor in Physical Education for Women in 1948. During her sabbatical in 1955, Scwehn traveled to the Scandinavian Seminar for Cultural Studies and Education in Copenhagen, Denmark and focused on "activities in physical education and allied subjects and projects of wide cultural value." In 1963, after the retirement of Professor Helen Hazleton, Schwehn was named the Acting Head of the Department of Physical Education for Women. She retired in 1968.

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Carolyn Ernestine Shoemaker (1868-1933) earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Purdue in 1888, and later a master's degree in 1889. After spending several years caring for her incapacitated mother, Shoemaker found her way back to Purdue in 1900, taking on a position as professor of English Literature with the encouragement of Emma McRae, also a professor of English Literature and widely known "Lady Principal" of the University. In 1913, President Winthrop E. Stone offered Shoemaker the position of Dean of Women in addition to her teaching responsibilities. Among her accomplishments, Dean Shoemaker is remembered for her unceasing efforts in raising funds for the construction of the Purdue Memorial Union and ensuring that the alumni association remained an active organization on campus.

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Short came to Purdue from Hillsboro, Indiana. She graduated in 1915 with a BS and proceeded to teach at Fowler and Crawfordsville schools for two years. She was also County Supervisor of Domestic Science and acted as County Home Demonstration Agent in Wayne County, Indiana for one year. When the United States entered World War I, Short went to the Garfield Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C. to gain experience in dietetics. After the war ended, Short became the resident manager for the convalescent place of the District of Columbia Red Cross. As she wrote, "The last position left me in Washington with a desire to know more of the East. Consequently, I joined the exodus of war workers to New York City." Although Short was warned by her friends that thousands of girls were unable to find jobs in New York, she was offered three upon her arrival. She eventually became executive secretary of the Otsego County Tuberculosis Association in up-state New York, through which she taught public health, instructed school children on healthy behaviors, helped with the tuberculosis program, and assisted in the establishment of a community health center. Short was effectively the connecting link between the State Association and local organizations in the counties in the eastern half of New York State. After becoming "homesick for Indiana," Short moved back to the Midwest and became the health director of the Tippecanoe County Tuberculosis Association. Eventually, Short returned to New York and became associated with the State Charities Aid Association.

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Steider was born on April 10, 1924. She attended Purdue University and graduated with a BS in Home Economics in 1945. Her major area of study was applied design. After graduation, Steider spent some time as a fashion designer. In order to fulfill her desire to focus on art, Steider returned to school and earned an MFA from the University of New Mexico. While studying for her graduate degree, she chose to focus on realism, which was an unpopular decision with her graduate committee. As a compromise, Steider agreed to learn the egg tempera style, which involved layering as many as forty coats of pigment mixed with beaten eggs. This style, originally a favorite of Italian Renaissance painters, had largely fallen into disuse. Once she mastered the technique, Steider actually grew to love it and used it for the rest of her career. As she stated, "I find it very difficult to talk about what I do. I express myself in my art. Painting for me is like breathing and sleeping. It feeds my spirit." Over the course of the next few decades, Doris became an internationally recognized artist and the star of over eighty one-woman art shows, in addition to selling her work to more than 2,500 collectors. She appeared in nearly 200 major exhibitions and won more than seventy awards, including a Distinguished Alumni award from Purdue University. Steider was a pillar of the art community in New Mexico, so much so that a street has been named in her honor in Albuquerque. Steider also practiced photography and traveled the world with her husband, Carroll McCampell, who she married in 1972. She also published a book titled The Egg Tempera Landscapes of Doris Steider in 1996. Steider passed away in 2010, leaving behind a large body of artwork.

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Stein was born in Lafayette, Indiana, on October 12, 1863 and is considered the first nature poet from Indiana. After graduating from Lafayette High School, Stein attended the Art Institute in Chicago where she specialized in illumination and decorative design of manuscripts. Her work was recognized and exhibited in shows in Chicago, Indianapolis, New York, and San Francisco. In the 1880s, she became interested in literature and began to contribute writings to local publications. Her first book was published in 1897. In 1907, several fellow Indiana authors came to Purdue University to do readings in honor of Stein, including James Whitcomb Riley, George Ade, Meredith Nicholson, and Charles Major. Stein passed away in her home in Lafayette in 1923 at age sixty.

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Stock, a native of Indiana, attended Jefferson High School in Lafayette and graduated in 1964. Stock attended Purdue University where she earned a BA in Elementary Education. She went on to work as an elementary school teacher but was not satisfied with that vocation. Stock also worked as a flight attendant for Pan American Airways. During the 1980 presidential election campaign, Stock served as the Deputy Press Secretary to Vice President Walter F. Mondale. Afterward, she became the Vice President of Corporate Communications and Public Relations at Bloomingdale's Department Stores. Leaving the private sector, Stock returned to politics in 1993 as the Deputy Assistant to President Bill Clinton and the Social Secretary at the White House, a position that she held until September 1997. That month she became Vice President of Institutional Affairs at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Through her work at the Kennedy Center, Stock helped to promote the Center's national and international profile and also managed the Center's International Arts Management Programs. Stock was nominated by President Barack Obama to become the Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, and was confirmed on June 17, 2010. As Assistant Secretary, Stock will work to foster international bonds between students and professionals from the United States and abroad.

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Beverley Stone began her 24-year career at Purdue in 1956, serving in the Office of the Dean of Women as an advisor to student organizations such as the Student Government, Panhellenic Association and Mortar Board. In 1968, she succeeded Helen Schleman as Dean of Women with the rank of assistant professor. In addition to successfully pulling through the "campus wars" during the turbulent 1960s, she ensured that students' voices were heard, requiring that they be appointed to faculty committees and held "speaking seats" at the Board of Trustees meetings. In 1974, after the Dean of Women and Dean of Men offices were combined, Stone was named Purdue's first Dean of Students, the first woman ever to hold such a position at a Big Ten university. It was also in this year that she coauthored a book with her colleague Barbara Cook entitled Counseling Women. Stone was an active member of many professional and community organizations and recipient of numerous honors and awards. In 1980, Stone retired, and Barbara Cook became her successor as Dean of Students. A sculpture honoring both women resides in between Schleman and Hovde halls.

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Dorothy Stratton (1899-2006) became the first full-time Dean of Women in 1933, overseeing the construction of new residence halls at a time in which the enrollment of women students jumped from 500 to more than 1,400. During her tenure at Purdue, a liberal science program for women in the School of Science was enacted as well as an employment placement center. She helped established the Housemother's Training School that gave intensive training to fraternity and sorority housemothers from across the United States. In 1942, during the second World War, Stratton took a leave of absence from Purdue in order to create and direct the Women's Reserve of the Coast Guard, also known as SPARS (an acronym she coined based on the phrase "Semper Paratus, Always Ready"). Upon her retirement from the military in 1946, she was awarded a Legion of Merit Medal for her contributions to women in the armed forces. Stratton went on to serve as the first director of personnel at the International Monetary Fund and then later as an executive director of the Girl Scouts of the America until her retirement in 1960. Subsequent to her retirement, she served as a representative of the International Federation of University Women at the United Nations.

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Suddarth was Purdue's first female Registrar, a position which she held from 1980 until 1994. Prior to becoming Registrar, Suddarth had worked at Purdue for nearly three decades, since 1951. Two years after her retirement, the Purdue Board of Trustees approved emeritus status based on the fact that as an employee, "she was very qualified in quantitative statistics and had excellent people skills. At the time of her retirement as Registrar she had earned a national leadership role among registrars at major universities."

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Sunderlin was born on August 27, 1894 in Delmar, Iowa. Her parents were Floyd and Mae Scott Sunderlin. After high school, Sunderlin continued her education at Iowa State College. She earned a BS in Home Economics in 1919. She also earned an MS in 1926 in Household Bacteriology and a PhD in 1928, which made her the first woman to graduate from Iowa State College with a doctorate. After teaching at Louisiana State University from 1928 until 1931, Sunderlin came to Purdue University and taught as a professor in the College of Home Economics. She was promoted to associate professor in 1941, and she became a full professor in 1946. While at Purdue, Sunderlin oversaw home economics laboratory sessions. Two of the students under her supervision, Margaret Billings and Lucy Goetz, developed "the original convenience food" or Master Mix. The Mix was a combination of flour, baking powder, salt, cream of tartar and shortening that could be boxed and stored, thus providing the starter for numerous recipes. Master Mix was announced nationally in a 1947 issue of Better Homes and Gardens, and it received a very positive response. After the initial success of Master Mix, Purdue students went on to develop a string of ready-made mixes. Throughout her career, Sunderlin published numerous articles on foods and nutrition and the book Master Mix in 1951. Sunderlin herself also perfected a method for freezing jelly and jam in 1953. She retired from Purdue as a Professor Emeritus of Foods and Nutrition in 1954 and received a Centennial Citation from Alumni Association of Iowa State University in 1958. Sunderlin passed away in 1990.

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Sutton came to Purdue from Lafayette, Indiana. Sutton spent some time in Paris before her entry into college. While at Purdue, she distinguished herself as a bright student. Having at least some knowledge of French, Sutton became an understudy of Professor Pauline Mariotte-Davies. She also excelled in Economics. Sutton was also involved in the Philalethean Society, in the Purdue Girls' Club, and in the Y.W.C.A. After graduating from Purdue with a BS in Science in 1911, Sutton co-authored a publication titled, "The Efficiency of the Preparation of Ether from Alcohol and Sulfuric Acid" in 1913.

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Swenson was born in Logan, Utah on May 28, 1913. She was the eldest of ten children born to Swedish immigrants. Swenson's father worked as a professor of mechanical engineering at Utah State University. As the predominant language of the Swenson household was Swedish, Swenson grew up learning English as a second language. She attended Utah State University and graduated with a BS in 1934. In 1935, Swenson moved to New York City and worked at various jobs to earn money to support her writing. Swenson's first collection of poems was published in 1954. Her collection titled Another Animal won her recognition in the literary world. Altogether, more than a dozen of Swenson's works for both adults and young readers were published both during her life and posthumously. After deciding to devote her time to writing, Swenson worked as Writer-in-Residence at universities such as Purdue University, Bryn Mawr, the University of North Carolina, the University of California at Riverside, and Utah State University. Her work was supported by funding from the Guggenheim, Ford, Rockefeller, and MacArthur Foundations, in addition to a National Foundation for the Arts grant. Swenson also received the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, the Bollingen Prize from Yale University, and an Award in Literature from the National Institute of Arts and Letters. Swenson passed away in 1989 in Oceanview, Delaware and was buried in Utah.

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Thomas was born on May 25, 1938 in Ponca City, Oklahoma. She was the fifth child of nine in a family of migrant cotton pickers. During her youth, Thomas spent much of her time working in the cotton fields alongside her parents. Because of the migratory nature of her parents' employment, Thomas often missed the beginning of the school year in order to work. Despite this misfortune, however, Thomas became an avid reader. She recalls her early infatuation with language in an interview, saying, "My older brothers used to read to me and I'd get very quiet. I would become totally engaged with the words. When the minister preached, I heard poetry. In Sunday school and Bible study, I heard poetry. Even the town drunk spoke in poetry that only I could decipher." The Thomas family moved to Tracy, California and began picking vegetables. As a result, Thomas met a number of Mexican immigrant workers from whom she learned Spanish. Thomas attended San Francisco City College and the University of San Francisco. She later earned a BA in Spanish at San Jose State College in 1966. In 1967, she earned an MA in Education from Stanford University. After graduation, Thomas became a middle school Spanish teacher in Palo Alto, but eventually accepted a faculty position at San Jose State College in 1969. When Thomas left San Jose in 1972, she worked at a number of different universities, including Purdue University, Contra Costa College, the University of Tennessee, and California State University. While at Purdue, Thomas taught classes in English such as the Literature of Black America, and Creative Writing. In addition to her work as an educator, she also became a published author during the 1970s. Several volumes of her poetry were published beginning in 1973, and four of her dramatic works were produced in San Francisco and Berkeley during the late 1970s. In 1982, Thomas published her first major work of fiction, Marked by Fire, a book that won the National Book Award and the American Book Award. Since her successful initial effort, Thomas has written and edited numerous other books and collections.

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Thomas was the first woman to earn a PhD in Engineering from Purdue University. She graduated in 1946 with a PhD in Industrial Engineering. Her thesis was titled, "A Scientific Basis for the Design of Institutional Kitchens." Aside from being the first woman to earn a PhD in Purdue's School of Engineering, Thomas was also the third person to receive a PhD in Industrial Engineering. With Purdue's own Lillian Gilbreth and Eleanor Clyme, Thomas would go on to publish numerous books on management, including Management in the Home: Happier Living Through Saving Time and Energy and Scientific Management in the Home: The Empress's New Clothes. Thomas eventually became a professor at Columbia University's Teacher's College. She espoused the view that "every household should be organized on an assembly line plan."

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Vaught grew up in Lafayette, Indiana. She attended Purdue University and earned a BS in Home Economics in 1932. As a student, Vaught was involved in the Beta Phi Alpha sorority, the Purdue Religious Council, the Women's Athletic Association, the Y.W.C.A., and was recognized as a Distinguished Student. She married Leslie L. Vaught, a fellow Purdue student, shortly after graduating and settled in West Lafayette.

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Janice Voss graduated from Purdue in 1975 with a Bachelor's of Science in Engineering and went on to earn a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1991, she became an astronaut, and has since logged 5 space flights, spending a total of 49 days in space and traveling 18.8 million miles in 779 Earth orbits. Currently, Dr. Voss is Science Director for the Kepler spacecraft at NASA Ames Research Center, and focusing her research on Earth-sized planets around distant stars.

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A native of Lafayette, Indiana, Wallace was known to her classmates as a girl who kept "many irons in the fire and tends them all so well that, by her shining example, she makes life hard for her more easy-going associates." During her time at Purdue, Wallace was actively involved in the Philalethean Literary Society (for which she served as President, Secretary, Treasurer, Critic, Sentinel, and Censor over the span of four years), the Purdue Girls' Club, and the Girls' Glee Club. She was also an alumni editor for the Exponent student newspaper, a staff member for the 1910 Debris yearbook, and the class historian. Wallace graduated in 1910 and later married Raleigh S. Shade on October 4, 1916.

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Mary Ellen Weber earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from Purdue in 1984. She then went on to earn a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of California in 1988. After working for Texas Instruments where she created a revolutionary reactor for manufacturing computer chips, Weber was selected by NASA in 1992 as a member of the fourteenth group of astronauts. Weber held a variety of different positions over the next 10 years, logging 450 hours in outer space. She is most well known for her appearance on the space shuttle Discovery in 1995. Currently, she is Vice President at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. She is also an active speaker on topics of performance, risk, and success, as well as a speaking consultant and coach.

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Wentz was born in Indianapolis on April 8, 1866. She attended public schools in Indianapolis and eventually graduated from Lafayette High School. She received a BS in Science 1887 and an MS in 1890 from Purdue University. During her time at Purdue, Wentz also worked as an instructor in mathematics, continuing in this capacity until 1893. She later did graduate work at Cornell University. When the Emmerich Manual Training High School opened in 1895 in Indianapolis, Wentz was hired to teach mathematics. In 1904, when the mathematics department was fully organized, she became the head of the department and held that position until her retirement in 1931. Wentz was known widely as an outstanding teacher, and she had many former pupils go on to become notable engineers and mathematicians. One of her former students described her as "without a doubt one of the most beloved and remarkable teachers in the city." Apart from her teaching activities, Wentz was also a member of numerous teachers' and science societies and associations. She also served as the president and vice-president of the Purdue Alumni Association in Indianapolis for several years. Wentz passed away in Indianapolis in 1938 at the age of 72.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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White attended Purdue University and graduated with a BA in Communications in 1999. In that same year, she led the Boilermakers to their first national championship. During her senior year, White led her teammates in points earned, three-point field goal percentage, and assists per game. The team had a nearly perfect season, ending the year with a record of 34 wins and one loss. Due to her outstanding sportsmanship, White was also recognized nationally as the winner of the Wade Trophy, which was awarded to the national college player of the year. White joined the WNBA in 1999 as a professional basketball player until her retirement in 2004. Currently, White is employed as an assistant coach for the Chicago Sky. She also works as the Color Analyst and In-Studio Analyst for the Big Ten Network. White is one of only two women named on a list of the 50 greatest basketball players in Indiana history.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Helen Bass Williams (1916 - 1991) was a significant figure in the Civil Rights movement before coming to Purdue in 1968 as an instructor in French and a counselor in the School of Humanities, Social Science, and Education (HSSE). Born and raised in rural southern Illinois, Ms. Williams earned two master's degrees, one in public health from North Central College in Durham, North Carolina, and the other in French and Education from Southern Illinois University. Williams worked throughout the South during the Martin Luther King Jr. era as a public health worker, educator, and civil rights leader. She was beaten, gassed, and jailed in Mississippi as she fought for freedom and civil rights. When Helen Bass Williams was hired as Purdue's first black faculty member in 1968 she brought to Purdue a living story of the Deep South during the civil rights era and the crisis facing America at the time. She served on committees that helped establish programs that reflected the University's commitment to change, including attempts to attract more minority students and faculty, develop more diverse course content, and create the Black Studies program. Her home near campus quickly became a welcoming place for many black students, whether for rented rooms, friendly meals, or conversation regarding concerns about the campus social climate and academic challenges. This informal nurturing role turned into an institutional one as Helen Bass Williams helped found what would become the Black Culture Center and The Learning Center. She also served on the first executive board of the Black Faculty and Staff Council in 1975. After retirement, Helen Bass Williams returned to her home in southern Illinois and passed away in 1991. In 1993, the Helen Bass Williams scholarship award was established as a tribute to her life and work.

Notable Women in Purdue History
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Dr. Cecilia Zissis served at Purdue for 37 years, including as Assistant and Associate Dean of Women at Purdue from 1950 until 1974. She received her B.S. in English in 1949 and her M.S. in Counseling in 1953, both from Purdue. In 1962, she received her Ph.D. in Counseling and Guidance from the University of Michigan. Zissis succeeded Helen Schleman as director of the Span Plan Program in 1970, which assisted older-than-average and non-traditional students acclimate to the university environment. In 1972, Zissis began teaching "Educational Planning for Women," a class which is offered at Purdue to this day. She was a co-advisor of the Old Masters student organization, and was also active is was active in organizations such as the International Center and the Purdue's Women Caucus, amongst many others. She is was a recipient of the Helen Schleman Gold Medallion Award for her distinguished contributions to Purdue (1974); the Award of Distinction from the Indiana Deans (1986); the Citation of Recognition from the National Association of Women Deans, Administrators and Counselors (1987); an American Association of University of Women (AAUW) National Board Citation; and the YWCA Salute to Women Award (1987).